Abstracts

Abstracts

Abstracts

Name: Lindy Louise Johnson
Department: Language & Literacy Education
Poster Title: How Doctoral Students Learn to Conduct Research
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate how doctoral students learn to conduct research-dev in the College of Education at The University of Georgia.  The research-dev questions included:  1. How are doctoral students trained to conduct research-dev across departments in the COE?  2. What types of activities do students engage in during their research-dev apprenticeships?  3. What do students report about how their research-dev apprenticeship and research-dev coursework have prepared them to become independent research-devers and scholars?    The study employed a voluntary online survey that inquired into the research-dev experience of COE doctoral students.  The survey responses were analyzed using SPSS.
Name: Hilary Hughes-Decatur
Department: Elementary & Social Studies Education
Poster Title: Phenomenal Bodies, Phenomenal Girls: How Young Adolescent Girls Experience Being Enough in Their Bodies
Abstract: In this phenomenological study, I asked what it was like for the seventh grade girls who participated in my dissertation study to experience moments of what I refer to as “bodily-not-enoughness”–moments when someone or something was telling them they were not enough of something in their bodies.  I describe various moments when the girls seemed to embody some kind of resistance-to bodily-not-enoughness by talking-back-TO those societal messages telling them they were not pretty-enough, thin-enough, English-speaking-enough, white-enough, popular-enough, etc.; and I use those moments to suggest that as adults, qualitative research-devers, and educators we need to begin listening differently.
Name: Marisa Schlieber
Department: Educational Psychology – Applied Cognition and Development
Poster Title: The effects of lead on Head Start children’s social skills development
Abstract: The study examined the effect of lead exposure on the development of children’s social skills from kindergarten through third grade. Participants had been enrolled in Head Start. Children with lead poisoning were compared to children without lead poisoning. Parents and teachers provided ratings on children’s social skills assessed from kindergarten to third grade. Results suggest that children whose parents reported lead exposure for their child rated their children as having poorer social skills than children who were not exposed to lead. The same outcome was found for teacher ratings of children’s social skills with regard to lead exposure.
Name: Lisa Sperling
Department: College Student Affairs Administration
Poster Title: Millennial College Students’ Perceptions of the Federal Government:  A Qualitative Study
Abstract: There is an impending workforce shortage at the federal level of government as agencies continue to face the Baby Boomer retirement wave.  Who will fill these positions? The traditional answer has been the students currently in college. However, this is a unique generation that has lived through the tragedies of September 11th and Hurricane Katrina, and have grown up with computers and the Internet affecting and altering the ways they learn. The following qualitative study sought to answer the questions, how do millennial college students perceive the federal government and how are these perceptions formed, through in-depth interviews with current undergraduate students with a demonstrated interest in the field.
Name: Lin-Miao Lu
Department: Language and Literacy Education
Poster Title: The Un-innocence of Children’s Literature: Ideological Representations of the Illustrated History of Taiwan
Abstract: Sociologists of school knowledge frequently argue that knowledge taught and distributed in school contexts is constructed of selected knowledge that favors certain groups of people and serves specific functions in a society. Drawing on the sociology of school knowledge, critical theories of ideology, hegemony, and selective tradition, the research-dev investigates the relations between literary representations and contemporary socio-economic, cultural, and political circumstances within which the literature was published. Specifically, this research-dev focuses on the examination of visual representations of the history of Taiwan illustrated in Taiwanese children’s literature published after World War II to uncover ideological assumptions and persuasions.
Name: Mary Lutz
Department: Educational Psychology and Instructional Technology
Poster Title: Comparison of Two Flashcard Methods for Improving Sight Word Reading in 1st and 2nd Grade Students
Abstract: Reading intervention strategies that are effective, inexpensive, and quick to administer are ideal for use within classroom settings. Using a single subject research-dev design, we compared the efficacy of two flashcard methods used for teaching sight words. The interventions were administered to four students (1st and 2nd grade) in an alternating treatment design, four times per week for four to five weeks. Results indicate that both methods were effective for improving reading accuracy and long term retention for all participants. One method, however, helped students to acquire mastery of more sight words over the same period of time.
Name: Youn-Jeng Choi
Department: Educational Psychology & Instructional Technology
Poster Title: A Multilevel Analysis for 2007 TIMSS Mathematics Test in the International Studies
Abstract: Educational data has a hierarchical structure. Three level variables, student, teacher, and school backgrounds, will be considered as independent variables in my study. The students from seven countries were collected so we will explore how differently each independent variable influences on math achievement in each country.
Name: Matthew D. Lovelace
Department: Educational Psychology & Instructional Technology
Poster Title: Teaching Within Social Networks: The Value of Facebook as an Online Discussion Forum in College Courses
Abstract: In this study, we investigate how online forum type affects student participation in online discussions used to supplement a traditional university course. Two forums (eLC vs. Facebook) are compared as tools for online student discussion. A quasi-experimental design allows for comparison of student engagement in online discussion across two sections of the same class. Two courses (Introduction to Philosophy and Introduction to Women’s Studies) are included in the study, and student responses are tracked throughout an academic semester. Student engagement is assessed both quantitatively through numerical measures of student posts and qualitatively using textual analysis. Preliminary findings are presented.
Name: Nicole Barned
Department: Educational Psychology and Instructional Technology
Poster Title: Knowledge and Attitudes of Early Childhood Preservice Teachers Regarding the Inclusion of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Abstract: Limited research-dev exists on what early childhood education preservice teachers know and believe about children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and their inclusion in general education classrooms. In this preliminary study, the knowledge and attitudes of 15 early childhood preservice teachers at a large southeastern university were surveyed using a modified version of the Autism Inclusion Questionnaire (Segall, 2008); four of these participants also engaged in subsequent in-depth interviews.  Results indicated that these preservice teachers lacked knowledge and held some basic misconceptions about ASD and the needs of children with ASD in inclusive classrooms. Implications for this study are discussed.
Name: Tonia Dousay
Department: Educational Psychology & Instructional Technology
Poster Title: Analyzing and Evaluating the Phases of ADDIE
Abstract: For, decades of research-devers have created new models of instructional design. Yet, as the field continues to grow, the ADDIE process underlying most models is continually attacked with arguments against what is perceived to be a simplistic view on design and development. This case study examines how one team of students used ADDIE to redesign training for a community nature center as part of an experiential learning activity. Ultimately, the students were able to use the systematic approach prescribed in ADDIE to build an effective instructional product that successfully met with stakeholder’s expectations.
Name: Terence Ryan
Department: Kinesiology
Poster Title: EFFECTS OF ELECTRICALLY-INDUCED RESISTANCE TRAINING ON PARALYZED MUSCLE.
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of electrically-induced resistance training on muscle metabolism and limb composition in paralyzed muscle.  Five subjects spinal cord injury (ASIA AIS-A) performed electrically-induced resistance training.  Muscle metabolism was measured as the rate of PCr resynthesis using 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy in a 3 Tesla MRI scanner. PCr recovery rate averaged 94.1 +/- 31.7 (mean +/- SD) and 89.2 +/- 45.1 seconds before and after resistance training, respectively (P > 0.05). In conclusion, electrically-induced resistance training increased performance and muscle mass, but did not reduce muscle fat or improve mitochondrial function.
Name: Szu-Yueh Chien
Department: Educational Psychology and Instructional Technology
Poster Title: The Influences of Creating and Sharing Personal Digital Stories within Social Networks on Immigrants’ Construction of Identities in Language Learning Process
Abstract: The exchange of ideas, values, beliefs and the opportunities to cooperate with others are increasing dramatically due to the trend of globalization.  How people identify us and how we identify ourselves will influence the development of our social relation, learning or even work performance.  This is important to young immigrants who are puzzled with their identities.  Hence, this conceptual paper is aimed to delve into the process of young immigrants’ identity construction by analyzing young immigrants’ digital stories and negotiation with their peers within social networks from the perspective of sociocultural theory, Bakhtin’s idea of dialogism and visual literacy theory.
Name: Lisa Rohde
Department: Educational Psychology and Instructional Technology
Poster Title: Motivations and Anticipations of UGA Alternative Certification Teacher Candidates: Implications for Programs
Abstract: This study explored the motivations, conceptions of teaching, and needs of Alternative Certification (i.e., post-baccalaureate) teacher candidates at UGA.  Sixty-four candidates completed a questionnaire on their motivations, beliefs and anticipations about teaching, as well as reflections on their teacher education programs. Findings provide information about the varied backgrounds of these candidates, indicate their predominantly intrinsic and altruistic motivations for teaching, and describe their specific anticipated rewards and challenges of teaching. These results suggest several implications for UGA’s post-baccalaureate certification programs and alternative teacher education in general.
Name: Oksana Parylo
Department: Lifelong Education, Administration, and Policy
Poster Title: (The Lack of) Evaluation of Educational Administration: A Decade Review of Research (2001-2010)
Abstract: The purpose of this sequential mixed methods study was to examine thematic trends in educational evaluation research-dev published over 10 years. First, qualitative content analysis of 8 peer-reviewed journals revealed the lack of research-dev on evaluation of educational administration (only one evaluation focused on examining educational leadership-related issues). Second, descriptive statistics of all articles in three educational evaluation journals showed that achievement-related thematic strands accounted for about 50% of all studies (N=666), and noticeably outnumbered educational administration (2.4%), value education (3.3%), and student-centered studies (6.7%). These findings suggest the need for more research-dev on evaluating educational administration and leadership.
Name: Lauren A. R. Moret
Department: Lifelong Education, Administration, and Policy
Poster Title: Cultural Competency in Qualitative Educational Evaluation
Abstract: This conceptual paper examines cultural competence as an important element of responsive, democratic, and participatory approaches to educational evaluation.  Evaluators seeking to be socially just in practice must consider the core connection of values.  Linking cultural competence and social justice in evaluation engenders refusal to compromise personal beliefs for tradition or ease.  Culture plays an important role in how we think and create understanding about the world and those with whom we interact.  Through training, management, and diligence, evaluators must consider their own beliefs and biases and those of the evaluand. Only then an evaluator is considered culturally competent.
Name: Hui-Ju Young
Department: Kinesiology
Poster Title: Velocity Profile of Arterial Blood Flow in People with Peripheral Arterial Disease
Abstract: The flow mediated dilation (FMD) test assumes Poiseuille’s Law to calculate shear stimulus. The universal estimation of shear stimulus could lead to error. This study examined evidence for potential differences in velocity profile and the time course of reactive hyperemia in subjects with and without peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The variability of femoral velocity at peak systole was greater in PAD compared to controls. Time course of reactive hyperemia in the femoral artery was longer in subjects with PAD. Evidence supported a similar shear stimulus in the brachial artery between groups, supporting the use of Poiseuille’s Law in FMD studies.
Name: Jisu Han
Department: Educational Psychology and Instructional Technology
Poster Title: Influence of Parent-Child Shared Book Reading on Pre-Kindergarten Children’s Emergent Literacy Skills
Abstract: The current study is an examination of the influence of shared book reading on pre-kindergarten children’s emergent literacy skills. The quality of shared book reading was investigated by examining parent-initiated and child-initiated reading behaviors. Children’s emergent literacy outcomes were assessed using receptive vocabulary, expressive vocabulary, phonological awareness, letter-name knowledge, and letter-sound knowledge. Results indicated shared book reading had a prominent influence on children’s acquisition of expressive vocabulary skills during the pre-kindergarten year, even when accounting for maternal educational level. Additional results indicated a significant influence on children’s letter-sounds knowledge after considering children’s initial skills at pre-kindergarten entry.
Name: Daniel Larson
Department: Kinesiology
Poster Title: Road Cycling Event Preferences for Racing Cyclists
Abstract: Despite persistent levels of participation in bicycling, little research-dev has been undertaken in the context of competitive cycling event management and marketing.  This study explored participant preferences using conjoint measurement and plausible market segmentations.  Results of the survey conducted at three southeastern U.S. cycling events (N =199) suggest that ‘travel distance’ has primacy across nearly all segment groups, and differences in recreational specialization are reflected among other preferred event attributes.
Name: Rebecca Larson
Department: Kinesiology
Poster Title: FAMILIARIZATION OF A CLINICAL TOOL, THE TIMED 25 FOOT WALK TEST, IN INDIVIDUALS WITH RELAPSING REMITTING MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS
Abstract: Recommended timed 25-foot walk (T25-FW) clinical test administration procedures include using the mean of two sequential walk trials. The purpose of our study was to evaluate testing across repeated sessions to determine whether practice would influence performance outcomes. Thirty six individuals with relapsing remitting (RR) MS completed the T25-FW on two test days separated by a week.  Mean T25-FW performance improved (p<0.05; 8.5%) from testing session 1 to test session 2. These findings provide evidence of a practice effect between repeated test sessions of the T25-FW test in individuals with RRMS. Familiarization may minimize performance bias associated with practice effect.
Name: Joseph Pate
Department: Counseling and Human Development Services
Poster Title: Found Poetry on Music Listening: Poetizing and the  “Art” of Phenomenological Inquiry
Abstract: Van Manen (1990) asserted phenomenology is, ultimately, a poetizing project.  In this presentation, poetic inquiry is leveraged (Butler-Kisber, 2010; Richardson, 2002) as a potential methodological strategy within phenomenological inquiry.  Accessing Vagle’s (2010) Post-Intentional Phenomenological Research Approach, this arts-based orientation to data analysis creates opportunities to complexify and reveal the tentative and fleeting lived-experiences of those who express a deep connection with music. Generated found poems, motivation for poetic representation of data, issues of quality concerning the use of poetry in research-dev, and the process of how the poems were crafted create an opportunity for dialogue concerning alternative research-dev approaches to analysis and the representation of findings.
Name: Sharlonne D. Rollin
Department: Elementary & Social Studies Education
Poster Title: Are You Sure This Is Math?-Using Social Justice in Mathematics Education.
Abstract: This research-dev project aims to identify the effects of incorporating social justice into mathematics teachers’ instructional practices.  Some of the equity-oriented research-dev in mathematics education has focused on traditional mathematics curriculum, documenting teachers’ inability to expose minority children to power issues and critical thinking skills through math concepts. However, research-dev has not adequately explored the instructional practices of teachers attempting to make such connections. By drawing on socio-cultural perspectives, the proposed study aims to describe the instructional practices of teachers as they attempt to incorporate social justice mathematics into their teaching repertoire.
Name: Eric Freese
Department: Kinesiology
Poster Title: Persistent Effect of Acute Sprint Interval Cycling and Energy Replacement on Postprandial Lipemia
Abstract: Increasing sedentary behavior and caloric intake are predisposing Americans to the metabolic syndrome. The purpose of the current study was to determine the influence of sprint interval cycling (SIC) on postprandial lipemia (PPL) and whether the replacement of the energy deficit created by SIC influences the reduction in PPL. The postprandial area under the curve (mmol•l-1•3 h-1) triglyceride response was significantly lower in Ex-Def (21% and 12%) compared to Ex-Bal and Con (Ex-Def: 3.31 ± 1.83, Ex-Bal: 3.78 ± 1.83, Con: 4.20 ± 2.09). Sprint interval cycling reduces postprandial lipemia, in part, because of the energy deficit created.
Name: Christie L. Ward
Department: Kinesiology
Poster Title: Body Composition and Physical Function in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis and Age-BMI Matched Controls
Abstract: The aim of this study was to determine if body composition impacts lower extremity physical function (LEPF) differently in PwMS compared to healthy controls (CON). Adiposity (%Fat) was assessed via DXA and LEPF via 6-minute walk (WALK), Timed Up and Go (UPGO) and Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT). Compared to CON, PwMS had lower leg lean mass to body mass ratio (LEG/BM), slower UPGO speed, shorter WALK distance and reduced SEBT reach (all p<0.05). MS status and higher %Fat and lower ratio of LEG/MS combine to elicit the poorest LEPF. Body composition may be an important intervention target to preserve function in PwMS.
Name: Anne O’Brien
Department: Kinesiology
Poster Title: INFLUENCE OF FUNCTIONAL TEST RESULTS ON FITNESS ROUTINES IN CURRENTLY EXERCISING OLDER ADULTS.
Abstract: Older adults are motivated to engage in physical activity to prevent functional declines and remain independent.  Purpose: determine functional status and influence of results of CS-PFP10 (objective functional assessment) on exercise routines of older adults.  Design: cross-sectional, mixed method.  Older adults performed the CS-PFP10 and responded to open-ended questions.  Participants were stratified on CS-PFP10 scores (<57 or ?57).  Comparing participants scoring <57 and ?57, 66% and 33% stated functional results were unexpected, 66% and 50% planned to modify fitness routines, and 76% and 83% were motivated to improve fitness, respectively.  Performance-based functional testing can be motivational regardless of functional status.
Name: Yanjin Li
Department: Language and Literacy Education
Poster Title: Different Conversation Strategies in the Interactions between NS-NS and NNS-NNS
Abstract: In this project, I explored the frequency of each conversation strategy that employed by NS-NS and NNS-NNS groups respectively, as well as how much misunderstandings and non-understandings occur in the two pairs of interactions. I first discussed the conversation strategies occurred  in the discourse of NS-NS and NNS-NNS groups in my recording data. Then, I compared those strategies and language features in these two groups to test whether Gass and Varonis’ hypothesis is reliable – that is the more shared background information, the less misunderstanding the interlocutors will have. Last, I provided some implications and possible reasons to explain the differences.
Name: Derek Monroe
Department: Kinesiology
Poster Title: GENE EXPRESSION IN THE MESOLIMBIC REWARD PATHWAY BEFORE AND AFTER WHEEL RUNNING IN RATS SELECTIVELY BRED FOR HIGH- OR LOW- AEROBIC CAPACITY
Abstract: We tested the hypothesis that rats bred for high or low treadmill-running capacity differ, both intrinsically and in response to voluntary running, in gene transcription within the brain’s mesolimbic reward system.  This system is responsible for the motor activation necessary to obtain rewarding stimuli and includes the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the striatum. Using in situ hybridization histochemistry, messenger RNA (mRNA) was measured for tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme for dopamine (DA) production in the VTA; D1 and D2 receptors for DA in the striatum; and enkephalin, dynorphin, and delta-FosB, which are regulatory factors in the striatum.
Name: Seung Won Park
Department: Educational Psychology and Instructional Technology
Poster Title: Designing a Virtual Tutee System for Motivating College Learners to Read
Abstract: This study proposes a design framework of a Virtual Tutee System (VTS) that applies agent technology to promote students’ interest in course readings and their reading compliance. The VTS is a computer-based learning environment in which students as a tutor are asked to teach virtual peers. With the VTS, all students will be able to benefit from being a tutor and receive motivational supports tailored to individual needs. The design of VTS is particularly grounded on two theories: role theory and self-determination theory. Based on these two theoretical foundations, the proposed framework provides four design principles and the component guidelines.
Name: Jared Brizendine
Department: Kinesiology
Poster Title: Using calf oxygen saturation to train people with peripheral arterial disease
Abstract: People with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) benefit from walking exercise programs. However, gait limitations can prevent an adequate walking stimulus. The aim of this study is to train individuals with PAD using calf oxygen tension measured near infrared spectroscopy. Two groups of participants with documented PAD (with or without gait limitations) will train while wearing an NIRS device. Body weight support (BWS) treadmill training will be used for people with gait limitations. This study will demonstrate the practicability of training people with PAD and gait limitations using BWS training, and test the feasibility of training to a specific calf oxygen.
Name: Diana Chang
Department: Elementary and Social Studies Education
Poster Title: Learning Mathematics Through Play: An Investigation of the Emergence of Mathematics During Playtime in a Prekindergarten Classroom
Abstract: This poster presents an ethnographic study of the emergence of mathematical thinking during playtime in a rural, low socioeconomic, predominantly African-American prekindergarten classroom. The findings showed that students demonstrated deep mathematical thinking while they played independently. Furthermore, the deep mathematical thinking seen during playtime went far beyond what was taught in formal math lessons. The findings also showed that the teacher’s efforts to integrate mathematics during playtime were mostly a review of the basic mathematics taught in formal lessons rather than interactions that lead to deeper mathematical thinking. Implications of these findings and further research-dev possibilities are also shared.
Name: Cyntrice Thomas
Department: Kinesiology
Poster Title: Legal Realism: A Theoretical Basis for Empirical Legal Research and Content Analysis Methodology
Abstract: Legal realism is a theoretical perspective concerned with how judges rule and what influences their decisions. Legal realists believe that law is indeterminate and that judges are influenced by non-legal factors. While traditional legal research-dev is based on the interpretation of the law, empirical legal research-dev seeks to apply methods of empirical research-dev to the analysis of the law and judicial decision-making. Empirical legal research-dev speaks directly to the goals of legal realists. The content analysis methodology allows the research-dever to collect and analyze data from a large number of cases to detect trends and patterns in judicial decision-making.
Name: YunJeong Chang
Department: LDT
Poster Title: Effect of Computer-assisted Instruction on the Higher-Level Mathematical Thinking Skills of Students with Learning Difficulties
Abstract: Technology is increasingly applied to support teaching and learning students with learning disabilities (LD) as assistive technology, rather less attention has been paid on the effect of using technology as an intervention and instruction tool. This study provides an overview of the effect of computers on the higher-level mathematical thinking skill development of students with learning disabilities (LD). Studies using computers for interventions on developing problem-solving skills are synthesized and at the end of the review, implications for instruction as well as directions for new research-dev in this area are discussed.
Name: Jaqueline H. Shoemaker
Department: Elementary and Social Studies Education
Poster Title: Second Time Around – Grandparents Becoming Parents Again!
Abstract: The dynamics between grandparent and grandchild bring about numerous challenges because the individuals represent members that are one generation apart, each with different values, expectations, and lifestyles. The goal for my research-dev is to investigate and look at the different factors that are brought about by and that influence this phenomenon. By visiting grandparents in their homes, listening to their stories, and interacting with my participants, I aim to create a bond between home and school by building positive, affirming, and mutually respectful relationships with them as I learn about their experiences about becoming parents the second time around.
Name: Joelle Walls
Department: Elementary and Social Studies Education
Poster Title: Collaborative Teacher Action Research: Fostering Empathy through Children’s Literature
Abstract: A pre-service and an in-service teacher collaborated in a teacher action research-dev study of a language arts project designed to support fourth grade students in investigating the role of empathy in their own social interactions in school. Data included a teacher-designed pre- and post- attitude survey; teachers’ retrospective reflective journals; and student work (self-portraits; journal writing; a class book; class projects). Franks’ (1999) framing of ethnographic perspectives on classroom life guided data analysis and teacher decision-making that situated students and their experiences at the center of the work. Implications for pre-service and in-service teacher research-devers and teacher educators are discussed.
Name: Allyson Pennington
Department: Elementary and Social Studies Education
Poster Title: Collaborative Teacher Action Research: Fostering Empathy through Children’s Literature
Abstract: A pre-service and an in-service teacher collaborated in a teacher action research-dev study of a language arts project designed to support fourth grade students in investigating the role of empathy in their own social interactions in school. Data included a teacher-designed pre- and post- attitude survey; teachers’ retrospective reflective journals; and student work (self-portraits; journal writing; a class book; class projects). Franks’ (1999) framing of ethnographic perspectives on classroom life guided data analysis and teacher decision-making that situated students and their experiences at the center of the work. Implications for pre-service and in-service teacher research-devers and teacher educators are discussed.
Name: Shujuan Pan
Department: Elementary and Social Studies Education
Poster Title: A critical race theory reading of Chinese international graduate students’ experiences in North America
Abstract: “For too long, the histories, experiences, cultures, and languages of students of color have been devalued, misinterpreted, or omitted within formal educational settings” (Delgado Bernal, 2002, p. 105). In this conceptual paper, the author uses critical race theory as a lens to revisit literature on Chinese international graduate students’ experiences in North American educational systems. How CRT lens views Chinese students differently will be analyzed and described. In bringing a CRT lens into the existing literature, the author hopes to illustrate how CRT recognizes Chinese students as holders and creators of knowledge. Implications for educational theory and practice will be offered in order to make school a place where students from different cultural, linguistic, racial and ethnic groups can all learn effectively (Banks, 2008).
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