Wednesday, July 30, 2014 05:14pm
Archive for March, 2012

March 26th, 2012  |  Published in Calendar

The University of Georgia College of Education will recognize several outstanding faculty members, an academic adviser and an Honors student at its annual Spring Faculty Awards Celebration Luncheon.

Magnolia Ballroom
Georgia Hotel and Conference Center

Contact: Kim Bolen
706/542-2842
kbolen@uga.edu

March 28th, 2012  |  Published in Calendar, EPIT

UGA alumna Kyung Hee Kim (PhD, '04), an associate professor of educational psychology at the College of William and Mary, found that creativity was on the decline.

The June 19, 2011 issue of Newsweek magazine dropped a bomb with a cover story about the decline of creativity in America. Based on the research of  Kyung Hee Kim, this story was part of the awakening in this country to something that much of rest of the world has realized and acted upon—the importance of creativity to a nation’s well-being and economic growth.  Now, Massachusetts, California and Oklahoma are planning to use indexes to measure creativity in the schools. But, are more assessments key to increasing creativity? Is there really a creativity crisis?

Kim (PhD, UGA, ’04) is an associate professor of educational psychology at the College of William and Mary.  She has discussed her research with numerous news outlets including The Washington Post, U.S. News & World Report, The Wall Street Journal, The Metro World News (England), Superinteressante (Brazil), Periodista La Tercera (Chile), Korrespondent (Ukraine), the Globe and Mail (Canada), and others.

Room S151
Lamar Dodd School of Art

5:30 pm Coffee
6 – 7 pm Lecture
7 – 7:30pm Reception

Press release

March 12th, 2012  |  Published in Calendar

Vancouver Convention Centre
West Rooms 217-218
Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Please join Dean Horne and The University of Georgia’s College of Education for a cocktail reception in conjunction with the American Education Research Association and National Council on Measurement in Education annual meetings. Hosted by the UGA College of Education
See more information

March 27th, 2012  |  Published in Calendar, EPIT

Ford

“Teachers, Counselors, and Psychologists for Talent Development among Culturally Different Students: Closing the Achievement Gap for Students’ Sake, For Our Sake!”

Bio

Room 206
Aderhold Hall

The lecture is open to faculty, staff, students and visitors.

Please reply to Mrs. Kristina Collins adminldr@uga.edu by Wednesday, April 4th if you plan to attend.  Instructors who plan to bring students from class, RSVP to Dr. Tarek Grantham grantham@uga.edu and contact him for more information.  

March 27th, 2012  |  Published in Calendar

Tucker

Cynthia Tucker
Pulitzer Prize-winning newspaper journalist

The lecture honors Mary Frances Early, the first African-American student to earn a degree from UGA, and her legacy.  This year’s lecture celebrates the 50th anniversary of her graduation with a master’s degree in music education in 1962.  She completed her specialist in education degree in 1967.

Grand Hall
Tate Student Center

Press release

March 30th, 2012  |  Published in EPIT, Press Releases

Samuelsen

Karen Samuelsen, an assistant professor in research evaluation measurement and statistics in the University of Georgia’s College of Education, is once again seeking your donation for a worthy community cause. And once again, she’ll dance for it.

Samuelsen will perform in the 5th annual Dancing with the Athens Stars benefit for Project Safe at the Classic Center on Sunday, April 1. The audience votes for their favorite performance by contributing $1 per vote to Project Safe.

She, and her dance partner, LaDarius Thomas, are one of 10 couples who have been practicing for months in anticipation of the annual event. They will perform a salsa/swing dance to the Ricky Martin song, “Livin’ La Vida Loca.”

The event features popular Athenians who are paired with local dance instructors and then perform at the Classic Center. This year’s lineup includes Barbara Dooley, former State Rep. Bob Smith, People’s Choice winners Samuelsen, John Rogers and Alison Norris, and more!

People can donate by voting for Samuelsen at www.project-safe.org/Dancing-with-the-Athens-Stars.html or they can come to the show at the Classic Center.  The proceeds from tickets will go to the charity. Samuelsen and Thomas are couple #10.

Project Safe is a local, nonprofit organization that works to end domestic violence by providing shelter, counseling, education, advocacy and other services to women and children who have been abused. The funds that are raised will go directly to support Project Safe’s work with battered women and children (and their pets) in the Athens community.

“I’ve loved watching Dancing with the Stars and so this seemed like it would be fun.  Also, this benefits Project Safe, which I think is a great charity,” said Samuelsen. “I want to thank everybody in advance for supporting me and Project Safe. The show is always a fun event and this should be particularly exciting for my friends, colleagues and students since they will ‘have a horse in the race.’  It will be a great night out for a great cause.”

March 30th, 2012  |  Published in KINS, Press Releases

McCully, professor and director of UGA's Exercise Vascular Biology Laboratory, works with exercise science student as they read data from a lab participant.

For the past nine years, researchers and students in UGA’s Exercise Vascular Biology Laboratory have studied how exercise of paralyzed muscles—made possible by electrical stimulation—reduces risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes, similar to the benefits of exercise in the muscles of able-bodied individuals.

Now, those researchers are encouraging UGA students to help individuals with disabilities through new wellness courses that partner able-bodied preclinical undergraduate and graduate students with disabled participants. The people with disabilities will benefit from students’ projects, and in return, the students will gain valuable clinical experience.

According to Kevin McCully, a professor in the College of Education’s department of kinesiology who runs the lab and spearheaded development of the course, the course is a model partnership between students and patients that “might end up changing the way we do our pre-clinical education on campus.”

“We see our relationship with research participants as an equal partnership,” he said.

McCully

“A very important spinoff of the study,” said McCully, “is our relationship with the Shepherd Center, where we now partner our undergraduate students and graduate students with people who are paralyzed.”

McCully’s class is in the process of recruiting participants from other organizations, too, such as Extra Special People, a non-profit organization geared toward people with developmental disabilities, and Athens Power Dawgz, a competitive soccer team of men and women afflicted with paralysis, muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy and other disabilities.

According to UGA’s Institute of Human Development and Disability, the combined effects of disability and obesity cost the United States $44 billion each year. Due to inactivity, adults with disabilities are 58 percent more likely to be obese than their able-bodied counterparts.

The course—which aims to cover and address these issues—will debut this summer for students studying kinesiology and nutrition. But ultimately, McCully and his team hope to see the course grow into an interdisciplinary experience for students in more diverse academic fields—from physical therapy to environmental design.

“Students from the environmental design department, for example, could take the course and have a project developing an environment for people with disabilities to stimulate physical activities,” said Zoe Young, a first-year doctoral student who has worked in McCully’s lab since 2008.

“A lot of preclinical students need this kind of experience to amp up their resumes,” said Melissa Erickson, a second-year master’s student in exercise physiology who started working in McCully’s lab in 2009.

“Instead of just job-shadowing a physician or other professional, they’d really be able to get into the community, get their hands in there,” she said.

Erickson and Young, who both helped develop the course, foresee students developing the same kinds of skills and sensitivity they’ve developed as students working in the Exercise Vascular Biology Laboratory.

“It’s interesting to get an idea of a different group of people who need help and to see what kinds of problems they have and how I can use my tools and my skills to move forward addressing those problems,” said Erickson.

Because the course is aimed at students from diverse areas of study, McCully and his assistants anticipate a variety of student projects.

“For example, students from the exercise science department may plan an exercise intervention for participants with disabilities, while students from the nutrition department may seek ways to promote healthier eating and weight control,” said Young.

Whatever a student’s academic focus, McCully believes people from all disciplines can make a difference in the lives of those with limited mobility.

“This is a population that we need to help, be involved with, use our student body to help, and to conduct more research as to how we can improve the quality of their lives” said McCully.

Students enrolling in this split-level course, Current Problems in Kinesiology, must obtain permission from the instructor to enroll. Prospective students may contact McCully, Erickson or Young at mccully@uga.edu, melissa9@uga.edu, or zoey@uga.edu, respectively.

March 30th, 2012  |  Published in Features, KINS

For the past nine years, researchers and students in UGA’s Exercise Vascular Biology Laboratory have studied how exercise of paralyzed muscles—made possible by electrical stimulation—reduces risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes, similar to the benefits of exercise in the muscles of able-bodied individuals.

Now, those researchers are encouraging UGA students to help individuals with disabilities through new wellness courses that partner able-bodied preclinical undergraduate and graduate students with disabled participants. The people with disabilities will benefit from students’ projects, and in return, the students will gain valuable clinical experience.

McCully

According to Kevin McCully, a professor in the College of Education’s department of kinesiology who runs the lab and spearheaded development of the course, the course is a model partnership between students and patients that “might end up changing the way we do our preclinical education on campus.”

“We see our relationship with research participants as an equal partnership,” he said.

“A very important spinoff of the study,” said McCully, “is our relationship with the Shepherd Center, where we now partner our undergraduate students and graduate students with people who are paralyzed.”

McCully’s class is in the process of recruiting participants from other organizations, too, such as Extra Special People, a non-profit organization geared toward people with developmental disabilities, and Athens Power Dawgz, a competitive soccer team of men and women afflicted with paralysis, muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy and other disabilities.

According to UGA’s Institute of Human Development and Disability, the combined effects of disability and obesity cost the United States $44 billion each year. Due to inactivity, adults with disabilities are 58 percent more likely to be obese than their able-bodied counterparts.

The course—which aims to cover and address these issues—will debut this summer for students studying kinesiology and nutrition. But ultimately, McCully and his team hope to see the course grow into an interdisciplinary experience for students in more diverse academic fields—from physical therapy to environmental design.

“Students from the environmental design department, for example, could take the course and have a project developing an environment for people with disabilities to stimulate physical activities,” said Zoe Young, a first-year doctoral student who has worked in McCully’s lab since 2008.

“A lot of preclinical students need this kind of experience to amp up their resumes,” said Melissa Erickson, a second-year master’s student in exercise physiology who started working in McCully’s lab in 2009.

“Instead of just job-shadowing a physician or other professional, they’d really be able to get into the community, get their hands in there,” she said.

Erickson and Young, who both helped develop the course, foresee students developing the same kinds of skills and sensitivity they’ve developed as students working in the Exercise Vascular Biology Laboratory.

“It’s interesting to get an idea of a different group of people who need help and to see what kinds of problems they have and how I can use my tools and my skills to move forward addressing those problems,” said Erickson.

Because the course is aimed at students from diverse areas of study, McCully and his assistants anticipate a variety of student projects.

“For example, students from the exercise science department may plan an exercise intervention for participants with disabilities, while students from the nutrition department may seek ways to promote healthier eating and weight control,” said Young.

Whatever a student’s academic focus, McCully believes people from all disciplines can make a difference in the lives of those with limited mobility.

“This is a population that we need to help, be involved with, use our student body to help, and to conduct more research as to how we can improve the quality of their lives” said McCully.

Students enrolling in this split-level course, Current Problems in Kinesiology, must obtain permission from the instructor to enroll. Prospective students may contact McCully, Erickson or Young at mccully@uga.edu, melissa9@uga.edu, or zoey@uga.edu, respectively.

March 9th, 2012  |  Published in Calendar

Ho

Conference Theme: “Using Technology to Enhance Teaching, Learning and Practice in the Health Professions”

Keynote speaker: Kendall Ho
“Leveraging eHealth in Education and Practice: Opportunities, Challenges, and Lessons Learned (so far)”
Associate Professor and Founding Director of the eHealth Strategy Office
Department of Emergency Medicine
University of British Columbia’s

Georgia Center for Continuing Education Conference Center and Hotel

To register for the conference, see http://ebp.uga.edu/conference. For more information, call 706/542-8799 or email Suzanne Hall at shall@uga.edu.

Press release

March 21st, 2012  |  Published in Calendar

Krashen

Stephen Krashen, emeritus professor of education at the University of Southern California, widely known for developing the first comprehensive theory of second language acquisition, will give a talk and participate in a discussion.

G-5 Aderhold Hall

Press release